PPQUARTERLY
ISSUE 3, AUGUST IS HERE!
CLICK BELOW FOR CONTENT

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MAIN FEATURE:
MOSCOW & TORONTO
CONFERENCE REPORTS

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PSYCHOMETRICS:
STRENGTHS... OR A WEAKNESS?

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THE FUTURE OF
POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

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WHO IS MAPP UK?

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MAPP SURVIVAL
GUIDE

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Editor

Dr Kate Hefferon

Senior Lecturer/Co-Programme Leader, MAPP UEL

With PPQ attracting more readers and attention, we’d really love to get some feedback, so the comments section is now active. Please do leave comments where possible, and let’s get some debate going about some of the issues and thoughts raised in this issue’s content.

Publisher and Associate Editor

Julian Alexander

MAPP Cohort 6

A big thank you to all the contributors to PPQ3. Never has there been a better opportunity to establish the importance of valuing wellbeing as a vital component of contemporary life. Life isn’t just about having a work ethic. You have to take responsibility for your own wellbeing too. Even adversity offers the opportunity to savour, cherish, and be grateful for what you have. 

Positive Psychology Quarterly – PPQ – is a quarterly publication written and produced by MAPP students, alumni, lecturers, speakers, and associates – past and present. 

PPQ is a forward-looking publication focusing on how Positive Psychology is being studied, implemented, and changing the world we live in. Every edition is designed with enquiry at its heart – a main feature examining some of the latest areas of interest in the field, and several articles discussing activities and ongoing debates.

This third edition of PPQ has finally arrived, after technical hitches and a change in the web team forced some delays on us over the summer months. Unfortunately this meant some of the content had to be discarded, and a slightly smaller edition as a result, but we’re in the process of expanding our contributor base and editorial team (see Kate’s editorial on the Issue 3 home page) and our next issue promises to be the largest to-date!

Positive Psychology is growing in influence month-by-month with conferences and events being held all over the world. This edition of PPQ features not only reports from the international conferences held in Moscow and Toronto, but also the regular seminars organised by MAPP alumni Vera Hegarty in London to which MAPP students and ex-students alike are invited. Vera goes to a lot of effort to organise these events, so if you’re interested in discussing Positive Psychology and being part of the forward thinking taking place in the subject, read the article, turn up, and take part!

Also featuring this month is the first in a series of articles examining three of the key Strengths-assessment tools, beginning with CAPP’s Realise2 model. The next edition will feature VIA, followed by MBTI together with a discussion about the merits – or otherwise – of the usefulness of using these tools in a face-off between proponents and skeptics of the power of working with strengths. Much has been made of psychometric profiling, but it has never been so much in demand. So many options are available, and in the economically challenging environment we currently find ourselves in where organisations have so many able and experienced people applying for positions – or are looking to retain them – they want to up-skill, or cherry pick new employees as much for their aptitude and attitude as their experience. What does working with strengths have to offer? We’ll explore this over the next three editions.

In a similar vein, the next edition will feature a key article about how Positive Psychology is being implemented in the real world, and the “elevator pitch” for PP, together with contributions from as far afield as Canada, and a discussion of the results from the UK’s study on wellbeing in this country.

We’re really looking forward to bringing you more content, from a wider field of contributors than ever before, and encourage you to come forward and take part in PPQ as it grows.

And finally, in case you missed it in the last issue, please take time out to read Dr Nash Popovic’s fascinating article on his proposed unified model of happiness.

 

 

Julian Alexander